Coachella singer fractures foot while performing

Florence Welch, front woman for the band Florence and the Machine broke her foot last Sunday while performing at the Coachella Valley Music Festival.  Coachella has had some news worthy moments this past week with Rihanna and her new beau getting cozy and Madonna smooching fellow performer Drake on stage.

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(Photo: Scott Roth, Invision/AP)

Florence’s broken foot, which occurred as she leaped off the stage during Sunday’s performance, may not make headlines, but it is a great reminder of how a fractured foot can slow you down and as in Florence Welch’s case, have a devastating impact on your lifestyle.

Proper diagnosis is key to treatment and quick recovery, and when it comes to a foot injury, make sure you see a podiatrist, who is a specialist in diagnosing and treating foot and ankle injuries.

A fracture that is left untreated, or treated too late, can lead to chronic pain, a non-healing bone called a non-union, or a bone that heals in a bad position called a malunion.  A malunion can lead to other problems down the road as a result of the bone now sitting in a bad position.  Most fractures can heal with simple immobilization in a cast or a boot, but if the bone has moved into a bad position, surgical correction may be necessary to return it to it’s normal position.  So, it behooves you to have it checked by a podiatrist right away after an injury.

Kansas City Foot and Ankle offers advanced diagnostic technology to properly diagnose foot and ankle fractures including digital x-rays right in the office, which makes x-rays available within seconds of taking them.  Our physicians are highly trained in the latest treatment technology and proven techniques to facilitate great outcomes and quick recovery of foot and ankle fractures.

If you think you may have sustained a foot or ankle fracture call Kansas City Foot and Ankle at 816-943-1111.  We can get you in right away and get you back to your normal activities as quickly as possible, even if you’re leaping off stage at rock concerts.